Ganesh Chaturti Rituals Observed in Karachi.

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Youths of the Hindu Community bring the statue of Shir Ganesh Maharaj to the Laxmi Narayan temple and while chanting, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

The Hindu Community of Karachi celebrates the ancient ritual of Ganesh Viserjan at the Laxmi Narayan Mandir, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

 

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Hindu youth paying tribute to Shiri Ganehs Maharaj at the Sawami Narayan Temple, photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

 

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Women of the Hindu Community doing rituals in front of the Shiri Ganesh Maharaj statue at the Sawami Narayan Tample, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Ganehsa Chaturthi is the Hindu Festival celebrated on the birthday (rebirth) of Lord Ganesha, the son of Shiva and Parvati. It is believed that Lord Ganesh bestows his presence on earth for all his devotees during this festival. It is the day when Ganesha was born. Ganesha is widely worshipped as the god of wisdom, prosperity and good fortune and traditionally invoked at the beginning of any new venture or at the start of travel. The festival, also known as Vinayaka Chaturthi (“Festival of Ganesha”) is observed in the Hindu Calendar month of Bhadrapaada, starting on the Shukla Chatruti (fourth day of the waxing moon period). The date usually falls between 19 August and 20 September.

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Family members of Hindu Community doing ritual of Shiri Ganesh Maharaj at Sawami Narayan Temple, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

 

The Hindu community celebrate the ancient ritual of Ganesh Viserjan at the Laxmi Narayan Mandir, which lies beneath the NativeJettyBridge. Ordinarily, a group of 40 to 50 people come all the way to the temple with the statue in a van, or even on foot, if, they are coming from nearby places like Ranchorline or Lighthouse. But this year, people avoided coming on foot due to the traffic jams and the general situation in the city.

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Family members of Hindu Community doing ritual of Shiri Ganesh Maharaj at Sawami Narayan Temple, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi Pakistan.

Women and children, dressed in their best attire, crowd around each statue as it arrives. Some clap, others chant ‘Ganpati Bappa Morya,’ while other still whisper into Ganesh’s ear– an age-old ritual of sharing their secret with their deity.

Inner Child Never Dies.

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An elder labor digging by sitting like a child, photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

In every real man a child is hidden that wants to play.  ~Friedrich Nietzsche

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Man displaying toy car and the Innocent happiness can be seen on his face, photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

So, like a forgotten fire, a childhood can always flare up again within us.  ~Gaston Bachelard.

 

To speak truly, few adult persons can see nature.  Most persons do not see the sun.  At least they have a very superficial seeing.  The sun illuminates only the eye of the man, but shines into the eye and heart of the child.  The lover of nature is he whose inward and outward senses are still truly adjusted to each other; who has retained the spirit of infancy even into the era of manhood.  ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

Adults are obsolete children.  ~Dr. Seuss

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Toy vendor said he enjoys his work alot, especially when children around. He said I always find me in some child twice in a day, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

My childhood may be over, but that doesn’t mean playtime is.  ~Ron Olson

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An elder told me that when he was child he used to dig in front of his residence gate, “During digging my teeth grab tongue and I Used to dig with more power, I have same practice til date” Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Iftar: The evening Meal to Break Fast.

Muslims are shopping from makeshift stalls fro breaking their fast, July 11, 2013, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan. Image 

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Confectioner making jalaibi “Sweet water Filled Tubes” at his workshop for Iftar in Karachi, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Muslims buying eating stuff for iftar, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Confectioner making Pakoras for Iftari, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, pakistan.

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Samosa filled with potatos displayed by confectioner for Iftar, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Confectioner Displayed jalaibi “Sweet water Filled Tubes” at his workshop for Iftar in Karachi, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Iftar refers to the evening meal when Muslims break their fast during the Islamic month of Ramadan. Iftar is one of the religious observances of Ramadan and is often done as a community, with people gathering to break their fast together. Iftar is done right after Maghrib (sunset) time. Traditionally, a date is the first thing to be consumed when the fast is broken.